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  • Administration
  • Administration

    Pre-Conference Workshops

    PCW 8 - Foundations of SP Methodology: Best Practices in Administration

    Sunday, June 14, 2015 8:30 AM - Sunday, June 14, 2015 12:30 PM

    • Amelia Wallace, B.M., Eastern Virginia Medical School ;
    • Connie Coralli, RN MN MPH, Emory University School of Medicine ;
    • Diane Ferguson, BSN, RN, University of Texas Health Sciences San Antonio ;
    • Valerie Fulmer, BA, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine ;
    • Carine Layat-Burn, PhD, Haute Ecole Arc ;
    • Win May, MD, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California ;
    • Tamara Owens, MEd, Howard University Health Sciences ;
    • Karen M. Reynolds, BA, University of Birmingham ;
    • Denise Souder, RN, EdD, CHSE, Mount Saint Mary's University ;
    • Carrie A. Bohnert, MPA, University of Louisville

    Foundations of SP Methodology: Best Practices in Administration

    Workshop Overview

    Gain insight into diverse SP administrative practices, learning from top international experts in the field. This interactive session is a foundational module of the ASPE Core Curriculum Program. Participants will learn the essentials that define best practices in administering a Standardized/Simulated Patient (SP) program. Activities include discussion, interactive simulation, large and small group conversation circles, opportunities for reflection and portfolio development. Templates, Key Resources and References will be provided. Novice to veteran SP Educators with an interest in administration will benefit from this interactive session.

    Workshop Rationale

    Administration is a crucial and yet sometimes overlooked aspect of SP methodology. Having a well administered program with a flexible infrastructure is critical to maintain current operations and to ensure room for development. Building and managing a SP program can be daunting because of the many facets and moving parts. How do you learn what you don’t know? This session will answer this question and many more. Topics include strategic management of a program, recruiting, interviewing and maintaining SPs, building policies and procedures, and technology and data management.

    Workshop Objectives

    • Describe key areas critical to administering a SP program
    • Identify resources and tools useful to administering a SP program
    • Apply the presented concepts to strengthen the foundations of their SP program

    Workshop Planned Format

    • Introduction and Overview
    • Strategic Management of a Program
    • Recruiting, Interviewing and Maintaining
    • Building Policies and Procedures
    • Technology and Data Management
    • Reflections

    Presentation / Discussion Session

    PD 12 - The Business of Simulation

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:00 AM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 12:30 PM

    • Dena Higbee, MS, CHSE, University of Missouri - SOM ;
    • Mary Cantrell, MA, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences ;
    • Valerie Fulmer, BA, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine ;
    • Diana Tabak, MEd(S), University of Toronto ;
    • Grace Gephardt, M Ed, Arkansas Children's Hospital ;
    • Julie Mack, MS, The University of Kansas School of Medicine ;
    • Pam Shaw, MD, The University of Kansas School of Medicine

    The Business of Simulation

    Overview

    As growth in simulation activities continues, programs are more commonly being asked to develop business models, fee structures, invoicing protocols, estimates, and contract strategies…a stretch for many of us who started as an educational resource or service to healthcare learners. Regardless of whether a center is a stand-alone standardized patient program, or has task trainers and high-fidelity simulators as part of the overall picture, the environment within higher education is changing. This environmental shift also affects the dynamics of how we practice our relationship building, marketing, financial planning and the management skills needed to stay afloat financially, and perhaps compete with neighboring programs. This lively panel discussion will involve multiple institutions that all operate with slightly different “business” models. The variety of experiences of the presenters will be quite insightful for both new members as well as those adapting to evolving environs.

    Presentation / Discussion Rationale

    As standardized patient and simulation programs continue to expand outside of the traditional “box” of patient encounters, the need to become more aware of varying business models is critical for a successful program. There are pros and cons to adopting additional business processes into the educational setting, and our panel of speakers will be able to offer a variety of perspectives.

    Session Objectives

    1. Describe how the management of programs has changed over time.
    2. Identify a potential change in necessary positions within an organization.
    3. Discuss the logistics needed for efficient and effective implementation of business processes.
    4. Learn from several educators the variety of practices existing within the ASPE organization.

    Intended Discussion Questions

    1. How many programs are not charging clients?
    2. How many programs are being asked to establish business processes and perhaps become self-sustaining or profit generating?
    3. How are fee structures identified?
    4. Who are your key staff that help with invoicing, payment collection, and reconciling, if required?
    5. How have business processes changed in your institution?

    Format

    5 minutes: Introduction of speakers and topic

    60 minutes: Brief presentation of the program models at each school (10 minutes/program)

    20 minutes: Sharing from participants and discussion

    5 minutes: Summary and Wrap-up

    PD 25 - From Center Stage to Backstage: How the Transition from Standardized Patient (SP) to SP Educator Impacts Your Program

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:15 AM - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:45 AM

    • Corinna Wildner, M.A., University of Arizona ;
    • Robert Bolyard, University of Vermont College of Medicine ;
    • Abigail Martin, B.A., University of Texas Health Science Center ;
    • Joseph Miller, B.S., University of Minnesota

    From Center Stage to Backstage: How the Transition from Standardized Patient (SP) to SP Educator Impacts Your Program

    Overview

    Many SP Educators and Trainers started out as Standardized Patients within their own programs. For some, the transition was smooth; however, others have struggled with establishing new employee-employer relationships and incorporating their SP perspective into managerial tasks. For newly promoted employees, the evolution of SP to SP Educator/Trainer does not need to be fraught with confusion or frustration. Drawing from SP methodologies, theories of effective leadership, and critical examinations of power differentials, this presentation will provide a roadmap for newly promoted employees and their supervisors to better navigate an internal role transition. By examining ways in which they can utilize the current SP pool, veteran SPEs and Program Administrators/Directors can benefit from this panel and make informed hiring decisions as their programs grow.

    Presentation / Discussion Rationale

    SP Educators/ Trainers who have been promoted from within the SP pool are in a unique position to positively affect their programs. However, the transition from SP to SPE can be challenging for not only the promoted individual, but for the entire program. Specific training for former SPs hired into administrative positions can ease the transition and better prepare the employee to successfully navigate their managerial duties while effectively pulling from their SP background, when applicable.

    Session Objectives

    1. Identify the pros /cons of hiring from within your SP population.
    2. Discuss how power differentials between groups may impact the entire SP program.
    3. Develop specific strategies to train new SP Educators/Trainers to better adapt to their new roles.

    Intended Discussion Questions

    1. Does your institution hire from within for administrative positions? Why/why not?
    2. Have you run into any other problems hiring from within the SP pool? Any benefits?
    3. How do personal relationships established within peer groups complicate work dynamics when someone is promoted? How do you/can you address these issues?

    Format

    5 minutes: Introduction of speakers and personal SP backgrounds

    20 minutes: Pros/Cons of hiring within

    20 minutes: Navigating changing relationships

    35 minutes: Strategies for training newly hired SP administrators 10 minutes: Summary/Conclusion

    PD 26 - SP/SIM Center Administration: Reviewing organizational structures and data collection

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:15 AM - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:45 AM

    • Dena Higbee, MS, CHSE, University of Missouri - SOM ;
    • Rachel Yudkowsky, MD MHPE, University of Illinois at Chicago ;
    • Amber Hansel Walton, CHSE, Upstate Medical University ;
    • Perrilynn Baldelli, RN, MS, ANP, Stony Brook University Medical Center ;
    • Grace Gephardt, M Ed, Arkansas Children's Hospital

    SP/SIM Center Administration: Reviewing organizational structures and data collection

    Overview

    As the field of simulation continues to grow, so have the operational structures of centers. This collaborative discussion will review five centers’ staffing structures, and brief histories of how the structures have changed over time. Centers include SP only as well as integrated SP/mechanical simulation facilities. Discussants will also share their experiences, lessons learned, and barriers to collecting data necessary to identify cost-benefit analyses used to determine a center’s viability. We all know that data helps to drive and support simulation efforts within institutions, but is there a best practice to collecting this data? With the wide variety of terminology in use to describe simulation events, this discussion will attempt to review common metrics that are measured throughout five different programs and discuss the processes used at each institution.

    Presentation / Discussion Rationale

    Administratively, we are often asked to review staffing organizational charts to reflect workload, pay structures, and title changes, as well to provide metrics that show utilization, variety of learners, and frequency of events. This discussion will review organizational structures and titles, as well as processes that are in place to collect metrics at five institutions.

    Session Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Describe the key elements to be considered when developing an organizational structure.
    2. Identify the elements needed to maximize the collection of event metrics.
    3. Discuss the logistics needed for efficient and effective collection of metrics.
    4. Learn lessons from several institutions as growth has occurred.

    Intended Discussion Questions

    1. How do we create positions that do not become too limiting?
    2. What are the core positions needed for a successful center?
    3. What data is necessary to collect to present to administrators and stakeholders?
    4. What examples exist for efficient collection of metrics?

    Format

    5 minutes: Introduction of speakers and topic

    30 minutes: Presentation of the programs’ organizational structures/position titles

    10 minutes: Discussion of organizational structures

    30 minutes: Discussion of programs’ data collection processes

    15 minutes: Questions, summary and wrap up

    PD 27 - From Subjective to Objective -- A New Approach to SP Hiring

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:15 AM - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:45 AM

    • Lynda Shadrake, B.S., UIC Graham Clinical Performance Center ;
    • Robert Kiser, BA, University of Illinois at Chicago ;
    • Martin Hurm, MFA, University of Illinois at Chicago ;
    • Shole Milos, BA, University of IL ;
    • Laura McKenzie, BS, University of Illinois at Chicago

    From Subjective to Objective -- A New Approach to SP Hiring

    Overview

    How often has this happened to you: you hire someone you think will be an effective Standardized Patient only to find that they are incapable of doing the job? Effective SPs must possess certain skills, and determining how to assess these skills in a job interview will not only save your SP Center time and money, but will also ultimately lead to better job performance by your SPs. This session examines how to take a practical approach to SP hiring by borrowing both from the business world and the theater world. By using behavioral interview questions to assess key personality traits, a mock encounter to assess performance and adaptability, and a debriefing session with an objective checklist for scoring each candidate, we have created an entirely new approach to SP hiring. We have had two years since implementing this process and will now be able to comment on how this new approach to SP Hiring has worked for our center.

    Presentation / Discussion Rationale

    When hiring SPs it is important to be able to assess if a potential new hire has the necessary skills for an effective performance. Creating a practical approach to SP hiring will increase the likelihood of hiring the right people, saving time and money in the long run.

    Session Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Identify effective traits of an SP
    2. Outline a center specific approach to hiring
    3. Incorporate and utilize tools for objective evaluation of potential SPs

    Intended Discussion Questions

    1. What do you look for when you are hiring an SP?
    2. What are some adverse outcomes to poor hiring choices?
    3. What is your current interview process? How has that served and/or failed to serve you in hiring SPs?
    4. How important is the interview process to the effectiveness of your center?
    5. Why does an objective approach increase the likelihood of positive outcomes?

    Format

    Session Activities: Introduction of speakers and topic Discussion / Sharing of SP New Hire Horror Stories Presentation of our new objective hiring process Role-playing with interview techniques Brainstorming sessions to develop unique checklists Discussion of key ideas, techniques and challenges Summary and Wrap Up

    PD 31 - You Found Them – They Showed Up – Now What?

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 11:00 AM - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 12:30 PM

    • Karen L. Reynolds, RN, MS, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine ;
    • Mary Aiello, MA, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine ;
    • Henrike Hoelzer, PhD, Charite Universitats Medizin Berlin ;
    • Tamara Owens, MEd, Howard University Health Sciences ;
    • Karen M. Reynolds, BA, University of Birmingham

    You Found Them – They Showed Up – Now What?

    Overview

    There are a variety of methods and formats to screen and orient new standardized patients/simulated patients (SPs) to the needs of the program. Because faculty/trainer time is limited, orientation plans that minimize faculty time yet maximize basic skill training for SPs and increase the accuracy and consistency of their performance are highly valued. Participants will be shown how four institutions (two North American and two European) orient new SPs beyond hiring, and discuss how the methods presented may be utilized and/or adapted for use in their own programs. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences and approaches to this issue.

    Presentation / Discussion Rationale

    SPs, similar to other new employees/workers, are often unfamiliar with procedures specific to their work environment. New SPs may feel bombarded with information and unable to learn “Standard Operating Procedures” in addition to the case on which they are being trained. As a result, faculty and trainers may be reluctant to use new SPs in any but low-stakes events. Finding efficient ways to provide these employment basics will enhance the viability of a program and make happier, more effective SPs.

    Session Objectives

    In this session, participants will hear and discuss four methods for organizing and conducting basic orientation sessions for new SPs. By the end of the session, they will be able to Identify information and skills needed by new SPs prior to learning case materials,Identify the materials new SPs need in order to understand their role and responsibilities, Understand practices that can be implemented to help SP trainers assess SP potential and more fully orient SPs to the program.

    Intended Discussion Questions

    What other SP orientation practices do you use and what do you learn from them? What information do SPs need in order to do their jobs effectively? What written materials do you provide your SPs at orientation? How have they been received? What logistical problems need to be considered to implement the second-stage orientation session?

    Format

    30-40 minutes: Overview of orientation strategies used by presenters.

    50-60 minutes: General discussion and sharing of additional strategies by participants.

    Snapshot Presentations

    SS B3 - Looking at Simulation Through the Lens of Administration

    Monday, June 15, 2015 2:30 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:45 PM

    • Stephanie Schuler, NS, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

    Looking at Simulation Through the Lens of Administration

    Snapshot Introduction

    Looking at your needs from administrations view point allows you to provide leadership with the information they need that will in turn allow you to grow and improve your program offerings with the support you need.

    Snapshot Rationale

    If you understand Administrations needs you can provide Administration with what they need and ensure that you have what you need to consistently deliver quality, timely and innovative educational programs.

    Snapshot Presentation Description

    In this session we will give examples of the benefits of; creating a strategic plan for your SP program, tying simulation to the institutions strategic plan, understanding core competencies and institutional accreditation requirements.

    Snapshot Discoveries

    As we have worked through this process we have discovered that communication and understanding increases as we cooperatively work towards a common goal.

    SS E3 - Role Call- An SP Newsletter

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 2:15 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 2:30 PM

    • Cindy Bartman, BSN, RN, CHSE, Grand Valley State University

    Role Call- An SP Newsletter

    Snapshot Introduction

    As an attempt to build a community of standardized patients who work in our program we created a newsletter that encourages submissions and sharing among the standardized patients.

    Snapshot Rationale

    This newsletter format encourages teamwork among our SP staff. It is also an excellent marketing and recruitment tool.

    Snapshot Presentation Description

    Presenter will share the newest edition of the newsletter which includes a poem written by an SP and an article written by an SP. Presenter will also discuss formatting ideas and distribution.

    Snapshot Discoveries

    This most recent edition is almost completely written by the standardized patients demonstrating their enthusiasm for the project.

    SS E4 - How Are We doing?  Administrating Performance Evaluations

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 2:30 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 2:45 PM

    • Pam Cobb, , Eastern Virginia Medical School ;
    • Lorraine Lyman, Eastern Virginia Medical School

    How Are We doing?  Administrating Performance Evaluations

    Snapshot Introduction

    Doing a good job is important to SP Educators (SPEs), Program Administrators, Staff, and SPs. But how does one know whether he or she is doing a good job? Often, the only time SPs are given feedback is due to an issue or a simulation performance problem.

    Snapshot Rationale

    Regular performance evaluations allow SP programs to provide high quality simulation experiences, accomplish goals more efficiently and additional tasks without adding additional staff or budgetary commitment.

    Snapshot Presentation Description

    Performance evaluations allow opportunities for individuals to see how things are going, determine if there are problems that can be fixed, and establish goals for the upcoming year. This session provides both information regarding why and how to perform performance evaluations as well as sample forms used to assist the process.

    Snapshot Discoveries

    Regular feedback creates job satisfaction, longevity, and effective programs. An objective, formalized process of evaulation contributes to the overall success and quality of a SP program.

    SS E5 - It is Not 'What' but 'How' We Did it in 10 Years

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 2:45 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:00 PM

    • Melih Elcin, , Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine

    It is Not 'What' but 'How' We Did it in 10 Years

    Snapshot Introduction

    Using simulation in health sciences education started in mid1900s. Simulation has become a widely, well accepted technique for the last 50 years. It is now a matter of pride for many schools to use simulation.

    Snapshot Rationale

    Planning to use a new educational methodology, implementing it to the current curriculum, and disseminating it is not so easy. You should overcome many challenges. The best way to move faster and safer is to share experiences.

    Snapshot Presentation Description

    We started our standardized patient program in 2004. We were lucky to have a dedicated dean. The innovative design of the center provided us a grand opening. The team of the SP educators with their mentor-colleague believed in the methodolgy. When it became an established part of the curriculum, it was time to disseminate it.

    Snapshot Discoveries

    Administrative support, a dedicated team, relevant facility and budget are required at the beginning. Tenacious efforts are needed for implementation and dissemination.

    SS E6 - Using Open Houses to Recruit Standardized Patients

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:00 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:15 PM

    • Renee Dorsey, , Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

    Using Open Houses to Recruit Standardized Patients

    Snapshot Introduction

    Recruiting quality, new standardized patients is always a challenging task. We have found holding a series of open house dates to be an effective way to recruit new standardized patients for our program.

    Snapshot Rationale

    We have worked with different approaches to recruit new standardized patients and have found that holding a yearly open house to be a valuable tool for recruitment.

    Workshop Objectives

    During the session, I will share our approach to recruitment of standardized patients to our program and describe our open house recruitment approach.

    Snapshot Discoveries

    During our open house invitation process, applicants are asked to respond to a series of emails. This multi-step process helps to filter out those who are not good at communication before they have ever reached the open house. Generally, about half of those invited stopped communicating or had communication challenges surface before they were committed an open house date.

    Training Technique Sessions

    TT 04 - Innovative SP Hiring, Training, and Evaluation Process Improvement - Resulting in Increased SP Reliability, Retention and Performance

    Monday, June 15, 2015 11:00 AM - Monday, June 15, 2015 12:00 PM

    • Dena Higbee, MS, CHSE, University of Missouri - SOM ;
    • Dee Dee Farris-Folkerts, University of Missouri

    Innovative SP Hiring, Training, and Evaluation Process Improvement - Resulting in Increased SP Reliability, Retention and Performance

    Technique

    An innovative and selective hiring process and SP training/feedback program. On-going challenges/ areas for improvement within SP programs exist. This innovative hiring/training process incorporates a pre-screening process to determine case memorization ability, aptitude to evaluate learner performance, and ability to deliver quality feedback, prior to the onboarding process. This novel hiring and training process includes:

    1. the development of a web-based survey to pre-screen availability/interest;
    2. the implementation of quarterly group sessions to share program details and examine potential performance and team interaction;
    3. the implementation of a five-step training and feedback program to ensure accurate case portrayal, learner feedback, and on-going SP performance evaluation.

    Training Technique Rationale

    Consistent case portrayal and giving reliable feedback are challenges faced by SP programs. The implementation of an innovative SP hiring and training program has resulted in improved SP performance, retention, inter-rater reliability, and increased program quality. Documented standard operating procedures facilitate the sustainability of strengthened program-wide results. This study examines these innovative processes, improved results relating to the process changes, and the impact on retention rate of SPs, improved SP performance, and inter-rater reliability of SP evaluative skills.

    Training Technique Session Objectives

    This practical session will share details relating to development and implementation of this innovative hiring and training program and will demonstrate positive results received through constant evaluation of this unique process. Learners will be able to identify and understand components of the innovative hiring and training program. Learners will participate in interactive activities.

    Training Technique Format

    0-5 minutes: Introductions and context

    5-50 minutes: Interactive activity - engage participants in review of a “gold standard” portrayal with role-play and feedback session. Share innovative hiring and training program structure and content; discuss development, challenges, and benefits.

    5-60 minutes: Questions and answers

    Workshop Session

    W 14 - Management 101: Learning to Be the Boss - Planning for Success and Establishing Expectations

    Monday, June 15, 2015 4:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 5:30 PM

    • Diane Ferguson, BSN, RN, University of Texas Health Sciences San Antonio ;
    • Denise Souder, RN, EdD, CHSE, Mount Saint Mary's University ;
    • Tamara Owens, MEd, Howard University Health Sciences ;
    • Win May, MD, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California ;
    • Carine Layat-Burn, PhD, Haute Ecole Arc

    Management 101: Learning to Be the Boss - Planning for Success and Establishing Expectations

    Workshop Overview

    Standardized/Simulated Patient Programs (SPP) have evolved into vital curricular resources within healthcare education. As a result, SP Educators may experience a shift into management roles. A cohort of experienced SPP managers offering a multinational perspective will share resources on developing an outline for program and personal growth. This workshop will focus on how to make the move to management; strategic planning; discussing policies and procedures; using technology for gathering and utilizing data; and managing personnel (SPEs, SPs).

    Workshop Rationale

    Even with a background working as an SP Educator, a new manager needs help to define her/his role and new responsibilities. This workshop presents topics that are vital to SP Program success. Strategic planning is a process which helps organize and plan a program’s future role and responsibility within an institution. Policies and procedures, including those which address the supervision of SPs and SP Educators, help keep a program functioning and on track . Technology assists with the collection and management of data. A programs personnel are the ones who get things done and require thoughtful attention from managers.

    Workshop Objectives

    1. Define strategic planning and identify where your current SPP is in developing a plan
    2. Identify current strengths and areas of improvement within the current structure of the attendee’s SPP
    3. Discuss typical policies and procedures needed to keep a SPP on track.
    4. Identify program data management needs and technology that can assist with getting that data in useable form.
    5. Determine areas critical to managing a team (SPs, SPEs, techs, etc.).
    6. List budget categories relevant to SP programs (if time permits).

    Workshop Planned Format

    Introduction and overview-5 minutes.

    Presentation on strategic planning and SPP management-15 minutes.

    Small group work: SWOT analysis-10 minutes.

    Presentation on writing policies and procedures (P&P) for a SPP-10 minutes.

    Brief discussion – P&P table of contents-5 minutes.

    Presentation on data gathering and management-10 minutes. Brief discussion on utilizing data for learner and program benefit-5 minutes.

    Presentation on management strategies for SP pool and program development-10 minutes. Final discussion of presented topics-15 minutes. Conclusion and evaluation of workshop-5 minutes

    W 23 - Expediting High Stakes Exams With Few Resources

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:00 AM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 12:30 PM

    • Mary Aiello, MA, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine ;
    • Karen L. Reynolds, RN, MS, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine ;
    • Jordan Wilton, RN, MS,, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

    Expediting High Stakes Exams With Few Resources

    Workshop Overview

    Preparing and administering standardized patient examinations are common activities for SP Educators. These can be simple one to two station course/clerkship examinations or larger more complex multi-station examinations crossing courses and years. Many schools have examination software to help with the tasks involved. With or without software, all SP educators need to establish a basic comfort level in test administration. This workshop is designed to explore the processes used in the development and administration of a multi-station examination. Skills covered will be event planning, communications, scheduling, data collection management, and exam administration.

    Workshop Rationale

    Preparing and administering standardized patient examinations are common activities for SP Educators. All SP educators need to establish comfort level in test administration.

    Workshop Objectives

    Participants will be able to: Identify and discuss the steps involved in exam planning, including timeline development, communication management, resource planning and allocation, data collection strategies, and schedule development. Participants will understand and develop a Dry Run protocol for exam cases, identify and discuss key administrative issues in real time implementation of a multiple-station exam.

    Workshop Planned Format

    10 minutes: Introduction

    10 minutes: Admin Topics 1: Timelines, Communications, Resource Acquisition, and Data Collection

    20+5 minutes: Small Group Activities: Development of Timeline and Schedule + Q/A

    10 minutes: Admin Topics 2: Dry Run planning, Exam planning and administration

    20+5 minutes: Small Group Activities: Planning a Dry Run + Q/A

    10 minutes: Putting it all Together

    W 27 - Using Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head in a Table Top Simulation to Develop Team Work Skills for Staff and or Faculty

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 1:45 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:15 PM

    • Cate Nicholas, Ed D, MS,PA, Fletcher Allen Health Care/University of Vermont

    Using Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head in a Table Top Simulation to Develop Team Work Skills for Staff and or Faculty

    Workshop Overview

    This session will focus on a 90 minute table top teamwork simulation that is cost effective, reliable and feasible for any workplace. I will discuss the knowledge, skills and behaviors that contribute to a highly functioning team. The participants will work in teams of 4-6 to complete the simulation activity and then participate a in debrief that will generate application to real world setting.

    Workshop Rationale

    A highly functional SP team allows for increased staff and learner satisfaction, greater efficiency and effectiveness with less error. Unfortunately bringing together a group of highly committed and well trained SPs will not necessarily create a highly functional team. Developing interactive and highly engaging activities will increase the likelihood of increasing the knowledge, skills and behaviors that contribute to good team work.

    Workshop Objectives

    Participants will:

    1. know the elements that contribute to a highly functional team.
    2. understand the benefits of a highly functional team
    3. know the definition of teamwork, social skills and oral communication skills competencies
    4. reflect on team and individual performance that will contribute to improved outcomes
    5. reflect individually on lessons learned for use in real world setting
    6. be prepared to offer Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head table top simulation for their staff and or others.

    Workshop Planned Format

    Overview of Session Time 10 minutes Introductions and assignments to teams 10 minute didactic and briefing for simulation.

    60 minutes: Simulation Activity:

    1. Organize your team
    2. First round of simulation: correctly assemble as many PH family members as possible, and place on mat for inspection.
    3. Quality Control: Inspect and remove any PH family members are not correctly assemble
    4. Team debriefing: Teams reflect on team process, what worked well and what will they change for next simulation.
    5. Second round of simulation: Repeat simulation using lessons learned
    6. Quality Control: Inspect and remove any PH family members are not correctly assemble
    7. Debriefing and Final reflection: Individual lessons learned & application to real world. 10 minutes: Wrap up and questions.

    W 31 - How to Deal with Unprofessional Standardized Patients (SPs)

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 3:45 PM - Tuesday, June 16, 2015 5:15 PM

    • Elizabeth Kachur, PhD, Medical Education Development ;
    • Karen Adamo-Henry, MS, CUNY Sophie Davis School for Biomedical Education ;
    • Anthony Errichetti, PhD, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine ;
    • Anna Lank, C3NY

    How to Deal with Unprofessional Standardized Patients (SPs)

    Workshop Overview

    This workshop will develop some general guidelines for expectations educators should have towards SP behavior as it relates to the institution, other SPs and learners. A survey of program policies will be presented and discussed. Jointly we will develop strategies to categorize incidences of SP unprofessional behaviors and explore management solutions.

    Workshop Rationale

    SPs have become common-place in Health Professions Education, and their prevalence in training and assessment continues to grow. This leaves educators with the task to recruit, train and manage an increasing number of SPs. While this surely enhances education and safety, it also results in growing human resource challenges. What professional behaviors can we expect from SPs who may view case portrayal as a quick opportunity to earn extra cash, practice acting skills or vent frustrations about the healthcare system. Can we expect a commitment to education in individuals whose motivations for participating in our programs are not in sync with ours? Some SPs are employees and thus fall under the institutional guidelines for professional behavior. Other SPs are short time hires and there the expectations are less clear. Furthermore, since portraying patient cases can be emotionally and physically stressful, not everyone will be able to withstand such pressures while maintaining their best behaviors. What are optimal responses from SP educators?

    Workshop Objectives

    By the end of the session participants will be able to:

    1. Describe and categorize breaches in SPs professionalism affecting the institution, co-workers and/or learners
    2. List multiple strategies for managing SP unprofessional behavior with the help of decision trees
    3. Discuss consequences to various management actions

    Workshop Planned Format

    10 minutes – Welcome/introductions

    10 minutes - Review of literature and listings of SP policies

    20 minutes - Recall and categorize different incidents of SP unprofessional behaviors (work in pairs using post-its and flip charts, in small groups review and summarize participant contributions)

    20 minutes – Analyze management strategies using decision trees and identify potential consequences (work in pairs using worksheets) 20 minutes – Discuss in large group and vote for most effective strategies 10 minutes – Take home points/conclusion

    W 36 - "All About that Base, Bout Dat(A) Base, No Trouble" - Utilizing an Integrated Database Approach to Manage the Overwhelming Workload of Standardized Patient Programs

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:15 AM - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:00 AM

    • Kimberly Bertsch, MBA, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine ;
    • Valeriy Kozmenko, MD, University of South Dakota ;
    • Brian Wallenburg, NRP, University of South Dakota ;
    • Valerie Hearns, MD, University of South Dakota ;
    • Edward Simanton, PhD, University of South Dakota

    "All About that Base, Bout Dat(A) Base, No Trouble" - Utilizing an Integrated Database Approach to Manage the Overwhelming Workload of Standardized Patient Programs

    Workshop Overview

    Explore the integrated database approach for effectively organizing and selecting standardized patients, prioritizing activities, and planning of events. The integrated database has three components. Component 1: Utilizing FileMaker Pro Advanced software to create a customized portfolio database for standardized patients including demographics, pictures, cases portrayed, student interactions, skills, performance rating, etc. Component 2: Managing and processing activities with Event Request Prioritization Request forms identifying key information including core curriculum standards, educational needs, improving future practice of care, learning objectives, evaluation methods, etc. (https://www.usd.edu/medical-school/cfapps/Parry-Center-Requests) Component 3: Custom created operational readiness checklist (date of activity, start/end times, faculty names, center staff involvement, audiovisual software setup, and attachments such as scenarios, scripts, labs, imaging, etc.).

    Workshop Rationale

    Provide and share an integrated database approach that attendees can return to their institutions with. Discuss obstacles and challenges met by information overload, supplemental information, and prioritization/selection of patients and activities. This workshop provides attendees with means to get a head start on managing their standardized patient programs.

    Workshop Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Identify resources and tools useful to managing the operations and data involved with standardized patient programs.
    2. Identify types of data that standardized patient programs need to track and define the structure of the database.
    3. Identify ways of sharing and updating information.
    4. Streamline faculty communication through the use of a shared database.

    Intended Discussion Questions:

    1. What databases are attendees currently using?
    2. What challenges attendees have with their existing data management?
    3. What information are attendees keeping track of and how that information is used?
    4. How event information is obtained, retained, and shared among faculty and staff?
    5. How is scheduling and prioritization is completed at the attendee’s institutions?

    Workshop Planned Format

    5 minutes: Introduction of speaker and topic

    10 minutes: Discussion of challenges for managing a standardized patient database system

    20 minutes: Demonstration of components of the integrated database system

    10 minutes: Summary and Wrap Up