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  • POSTER GROUP A - TRAINING SPS
  • POSTER GROUP A - TRAINING SPS

    Training SPs

    Using human simulation in a course on aphasia – a way to strengthen the link between theory and practice.

    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:00 PM

    • Sten Erici, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University ;
    • Christina Dravins, Lund University Hospital, Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology

    Using human simulation in a course on aphasia – a way to strengthen the link between theory and practice.

    Introduction

    A course on aphasia in adults in a speech & language pathology program(3,5) was subject to criticism and poor evaluations. During discussions on possible improvement the method of SP was suggested. Aims of the initiative was to increase the constructive linking between theory and practice, to increase student motivation and to ensure students equal opportunities to encounter typical clinical presentations(1,2).

    Project Description

    One academic teacher with actor and director experience was appointed to implement the paradigm. Six iconic patients with heavily impaired verbal presentations according to the course objectives were created, three professional actors were recruited. During the initial weeks the students were presented with referrals and time to plan the sessions. The students, in groups, met all of the SPs. In addition, the students wrote journals. During the course activities following the “SP-weeks” teachers included reference to the characters in lectures and exercises. In the final PBL-case information was provided on the condition of the SPs six months following the first assessment. During this activity the students had access to the records of other groups.

    Outcomes

    An evaluation questionnaire was distributed. The result showed that 72 % were satisfied or very satisfied with the course activity. The SP activity was rated as the third most important learning activity among seven, headed by practice and lectures. Analysis of free comments showed that the SP activity strengthened the link between theory and practice. It was shown that credibility in the design was judged to be high. The students wanted more supervision of a tutor at the meeting with SP.

    Conclusions / Discussion

    It is good way to keep the “SP-cases” running throughout the whole course, the motivation to learn the theories stayed high. Since the diagnoses the SP’s portrayed have complex symptoms it is essential that professional actors portray SP(4).

    Two Years Later: Training SPs to Train Procedural Skills

    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:00 PM

    • Lorraine Lyman, Eastern Virginia Medical School ;
    • Amelia Wallace, B.M., Eastern Virginia Medical School

    Two Years Later: Training SPs to Train Procedural Skills

    Introduction

    Clinical faculty have historically taught their respective students’ procedural skills. Due to an increase in class size and curricular responsibilities, faculty has found they have less time with more students to instruct. To aid in this challenge, the idea of using SPs as faculty ‘extenders’ was instituted.

    Project Description

    SPs taught 144 third year medical students in the beginning weeks of their OBGYN rotation hand-tying knots for suturing and peg transfer for building laparoscopic skills. Over the course of two years, SPs taught 12 lead EKG placement, ABG draws, and LP procedures to 284 M3 Internal Medicine students. Additionally, 128 NP students were taught simple interrupted suturing with instrument ties. For knot-tying, peg transfer, and suturing instruction the ratio was one SP to four learners. ABG draws and LP had one SP to two students. 12 lead EKG was one SP to one student. The amount of time for each activity varied. Knot-tying and peg transfer were one hour sessions each, simple interrupted suturing with instrument ties were two hour sessions, LP instruction was 40 minutes, EKG and ABG draws were twenty minute sessions. Training began by faculty assessing the SPEs’ skills with the techniques. The SPEs identified and recruited a core group of SPs to begin training. All SPs were ultimately dry run on their procedural skill sets and facilitation of group learning proficiency by the SPEs. Faculty then quickly assessed the SPs’ technique with each procedure to verify they were meeting faculty objectives.

    Outcomes

    Surveys were distributed after each event. Students reported a high level of satisfaction with their SP-directed instruction. All students indicated the sessions met the learning objectives, had knowledgeable, professional instructors, found the overall experience “good” to “excellent”, and rated their skill level after the experience “improved” to “improved significantly”.

    Conclusions / Discussion

    Students and faculty have found these formative sessions to be an efficient and effective instructional method of teaching. The goals for the future are to develop an assessment tool to assess student proficiency and to study the effectiveness of SP-directed procedural instruction.

    Training Challenges When Implementing and Inter-professional Simulation

    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:00 PM

    • Diane French, RN, BS BA, MPA, Michigan State University,

    Training Challenges When Implementing and Inter-professional Simulation

    Introduction

    We describe standardized patient training challenges and lessons learned from implementing an innovative inter-professional simulation. The event involves 180 medical, pharmacy and nursing students and 24 standardized patients. Training for the SPs presents unique challenges resulting from multiple possible ways the student teams approach the case. Other challenges related to the use of both experienced SPs and naïve pharmacy student actors playing sons/daughters of the patient.

    Project Description

    Teams of senior year nursing students, fourth year pharmacy students and third year medical students encountered three different cases. Each team chose their approach to the patient (SP) and son/daughter. Since it was unknown if the team would decide to send one discipline in at a time to interview and then collaborate with others or if the entire team would enter together to do history and physical, SP training required the incorporation of multiple scenarios. The SP/son/daughter decided how to answer questions depending on approach and team member discipline. Teams were able to choose different diagnostic tests and the results required the SPs to be flexible in their answers. The SPs repeated the case twice and were able to evaluate the different approaches.

    Outcomes

    Differing team approaches required significant flexibility from the SPs. Though they preferred the team approach, SPs were able to respond to different scenarios presented. It was difficult for the SP to respond consistently if the 3 disciplines came in separately. SPs asked for training to include more diagnosis-specific information and for formal training between SPs playing the patient and the son/daughter. SPs enjoyed experiencing the hand off between disciplines during the simulation.

    Conclusions / Discussion

    This innovative experience creates SP training challenges. We identified training needs for patient and son/daughter teams in order to role play a variety of scenarios. The greatest challenge is designing broader SP training which includes information on disease, diagnosis, symptoms, medications, side effects and mental status. These lessons learned will inform trainings for future offerings of this experience

    From the Skills Center to the Clinic: Preparing SPs for in situ Simulations

    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:00 PM

    • Julie E Messina, MA, University of North Carolina School of Medicine ;
    • Kewana Smith, BS, University of North Carolina School of Medicine ;
    • Ashley Kellish, RN, CNES, North Carolina Children's Hospital ;
    • Gene Hobbs, NA, UNC Health Care

    From the Skills Center to the Clinic: Preparing SPs for in situ Simulations

    Introduction

    In situ simulation is becoming more common as clinical educators seek ways to increase realism and reduce costs while maintaining the patient safety benefits of simulation. The benefits that Standardized Patients (SPs), or those trained to portray actual patients, have brought to clinical skills centers are starting to be applied to in situ simulation. However, no recommendations have been published regarding the training that SPs should complete prior to working in a clinical setting in order to ensure the safety of patients, SPs, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders. The goal of this activity is to identify the gaps in SP knowledge regarding working in clinical environments in an academic medical center (AMC), and develop a training plan to address those gaps.

    Project Description

    Our ongoing survey is evaluating baseline SP knowledge in HIPAA compliance, occupational health and safety standards and procedures, and knowledge pertinent to working in the clinical environment at one AMC. Currently, SPs are required to complete HIPAA training but no other clinically relevant modules. This project will have SPs complete additional online training modules identified by AMC nurse and simulation educators as relevant to and necessary for employees to complete prior to entering the clinical environment. SPs will be surveyed following their e-learning to determine whether knowledge about working in clinical environments has increased, and scheduled for in situ simulations.

    Outcomes

    We anticipate seeing changes in SP knowledge in the topics outlined above as a result of the online training modules though expect baseline and final numbers to be slightly skewed due to a small sampling of SPs already working in clinical settings in non-SP roles. SP confidence in working in clinical settings should also increase. This project should also serve to protect this AMC from potential HIPAA violations and protect SPs from occupational injuries or exposures.

    Conclusions / Discussion

    A full discussion and interpretation of results will be available upon completion of this project in April 2015. Further research and recommendations for applying these findings will be presented, dependent on results.

    The Clinical Skills & Simulation Center (CSSC): facing challenges in implementing the Standardized program during OSCE (The Objective Structured Clinical Examination) for undergraduate medical students.

    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:00 PM - Monday, June 15, 2015 2:00 PM

    • Sumaiah Abdulwahab, Ph.D, King Abdulaziz University

    The Clinical Skills & Simulation Center (CSSC): facing challenges in implementing the Standardized program during OSCE (The Objective Structured Clinical Examination) for undergraduate medical students.

    Introduction

    The Faculty of Medicine is committed to provide high-quality educational programs to both Women and Men undergraduate students ;and had introduced the assessment of clinical skills by conducting the OSCE( the Objective Structured Clinical Examination) in the clinical skills & simulation center(CSSC). In 2011, had implemented well structured standardized program after intensive training through joint program of fellowship with University of Illinois (UIC)

    Project Description

    The aim of this study is to find out the implementation of the standardized patient program during (OSCE) had improved the outcome of the students and the limitations in SP program in order to improve the quality and the management . A Survey was developed which consisted of eight (8) questions and were distributed to 125 medical students in both 4th year and 5th year who had agreed to participate. Most of the questionnaires were about SPs and their performance. And since these Standardized Patients (SPs) were students who had been hired from other colleges on campus, and they were aware of minimum training will be given to them which will be on site on the day of the exam, due to fear of disclosure of exam questions.

    Outcomes

    After the analysis, 58% to 68% of medical students (MS) felt that the appearances of SPs was encounter part the portrayed cases. Most of the cases written with ages over 40, so cases were unreliability for assessment. 53% to 63% of MS stated SPs were supportive and cooperative however, 50% to 60% of MS declared that SPs were not well trained. Moreover, MS requested to have trained SPs during their clinical teaching sessions and during the formative assessments.

    Conclusions / Discussion

    The SP program is an important tool to practice in safe environment non- technical skills such as patient interviewing, communication skills, breaking bad news and physical examinations. The success of SP program, all portrayed cases must be validated by the curriculum committee and SP program must implement in Formative OSCE for all undergraduates to improve the outcomes.